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Forums Craft malting in the nordics Malt production FYNSK FLOOR MALTING

This topic contains 3 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  Marc Myers 2 years, 4 months ago.

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    Marc Myers
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    Working traditional malt houses are very hard to find in the Nordics. So when we found that there has been a project running since 2014 in Denmark to renovate an old malt house to its original form and linked to breweries within the region, we immediately arranged a site visit.

    Refsvindinge bryggeri og malteri is located in Fynsk, Denmark and is the hub for many breweries and beer enthusiasts. The Malt house supplies all produced malt to their local breweries and the malt is produced on demand by their specialist maltster.

    Both the brewery and the malt house are located on the same property, with the malt house able to produce a variety of malts from a range of grains for the specific needs of the brewers.

    The malt house runs a simple double steep system which is fed with pressurized air and temperature controlled water.

    Fynsk steep tanks

    After 2 days of steeping, the green malt is then moved directly to the germination floor for another 2 days of turning, stirring and careful control of bed temperatures.

    Floor malting area

    Once the germination process starts the bed is then transferred up by screw conveyor to a closed room for another 3-5 days of germination.

    Controlled climate

    The green malt can then be moved to the kiln for the final curing process of the malt and ensuring that the correct flavor and colour is reached.

    Oil based kiln

    The Kiln is powered through an oil based fire system and can reach optimal temperatures of 85 degrees centigrade and is manually loaded from the germination bed.
    The Malt house has the additional facility for smoking malts for more traditional based brewers and bottle lines.

    The relationship between the malt house and the breweries is close, with continual feedback and discussions that look into improving the quality of the malt produced. The traditional aspect of the malt house means that annual production volumes are approximately 50 +/- tons per year and the actual malting process is usually between 8 and 12 days (depending on the climate).

    Partnered breweries

    The concept of a cooperative between the farmer, malt house and the brewer is not new. We consider this relationship, key to the redevelopment of crafted beers for the growing market of experienced beer enthusiasts and the everyday consumer.

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